The art of wine making

Rich Taste, Immaculate Control

Creating a wine's unique bouquet while respecting the taste and intensity of flavor from bottle to bottle is a delicate balancing act. Clarification and stabilization, polish filtration, yeast and bacteria removal, final filtration for microbial stabilization and utility water and gas filtration are all vital to maintaining that balance. 

Contaminants such as particles, crystals, treatment residue, organic aggregates, bacteria and yeast can jeopardize the wine's taste. Applying Pall's technology and expertise to the art of wine making can remove risk and maintain total process control.

Carbon Dioxide Filtration for Sparkling Wine

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Clarification

Filtration is critical to removing yeast and other contaminants that can result in off- taste, color or odor, however, it is also essential to maintain the organoleptic characteristics of the wine. Clarification is the primary filtration step in the winemaking process. Yeast and other particles from fermentation and fining are removed to reduce turbidity and improve downstream filterability.
Filtration is critical to removing yeast and other contaminants that can result in off- taste, color or odor, however, it is also essential to maintain the organoleptic characteristics of the wine. Clarification is the primary filtration step in the winemaking process. Yeast and other particles from fermentation and fining are removed to reduce turbidity and improve downstream filterability.
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Filtration After Cold Stabilization

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Final Filtration for Microbial Stabilization

The objective of final filtration is to ensure the removal of wine spoilage organisms that can cause re-fermentation, off flavors or turbidity post bottling. The typical wine spoilage organisms include the bacteria Oenococcus oeni and Acetobacter as well as some yeast including Zygosaccharomyces and Dekkera (formerly called Brettanomyces). As the final filter is the last filtration step prior to bottling it is the most critical filtration step in the process ultimately ensuring brand protection.
The objective of final filtration is to ensure the removal of wine spoilage organisms that can cause re-fermentation, off flavors or turbidity post bottling. The typical wine spoilage organisms include the bacteria Oenococcus oeni and Acetobacter as well as some yeast including Zygosaccharomyces and Dekkera (formerly called Brettanomyces). As the final filter is the last filtration step prior to bottling it is the most critical filtration step in the process ultimately ensuring brand protection.
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Lees Filtration

Recovery of wine and juice from lees represents one of the most challenging forms of filtration faced by wineries. The high concentration and variability of the suspended solids limits the suitable filtration technologies, while strict environmental regulations and sustainability programs are increasing pressure to reduce waste volumes. The Oenoflow™ HS system is a crossflow filtration system designed specifically for recovery of wine and juice from lees producing higher quality product more efficiently and economically. 
Recovery of wine and juice from lees represents one of the most challenging forms of filtration faced by wineries. The high concentration and variability of the suspended solids limits the suitable filtration technologies, while strict environmental regulations and sustainability programs are increasing pressure to reduce waste volumes. The Oenoflow™ HS system is a crossflow filtration system designed specifically for recovery of wine and juice from lees producing higher quality product more efficiently and economically. 
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Polishing Filtration/Colloid Removal

After primary clarification, stabilization and maturation, fining agents, crystals, colloids and bacteria and may still be present in the wine. Polishing filtration is designed to remove these particles and haze to produce a brighter wine and improve filterability for downstream processing. Additionally, in the case of vintage or stable wines, polishing filtration may be the last filtration step prior to bottling.
After primary clarification, stabilization and maturation, fining agents, crystals, colloids and bacteria and may still be present in the wine. Polishing filtration is designed to remove these particles and haze to produce a brighter wine and improve filterability for downstream processing. Additionally, in the case of vintage or stable wines, polishing filtration may be the last filtration step prior to bottling.
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QC/Microbial Detection - Spoilage

Monitoring wine spoilage yeast is a critical to ensure quality product and brand protection. Yeast detection is commonly based on traditional culture method using selective enrichment, biochemical tests and microscopy. Conventional methods can be challenging because a high level of expertise is required and screening/identification may require up to 10 days. Pall’s GeneDisc® technology offers an innovative solution to accelerate the time to result.
Monitoring wine spoilage yeast is a critical to ensure quality product and brand protection. Yeast detection is commonly based on traditional culture method using selective enrichment, biochemical tests and microscopy. Conventional methods can be challenging because a high level of expertise is required and screening/identification may require up to 10 days. Pall’s GeneDisc® technology offers an innovative solution to accelerate the time to result.
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